Should You Publish a Book? (Or Why Writing A Book Builds Your Brand)

CTA_writer's deskI know it might sound a bit silly for someone who is both a ghostwriter and a multi-published author to say that you should publish a book to expand you brand, but I guarantee I am not the only one saying it. Writing a book is a wonderful experience, if you approach it in the right way and with the right goals in mind.

Self-publishing has made getting a book out there easier than ever; in many ways having a book is the new en vogue marketing piece for businesses and independent authors alike. Whether you have a story that you really want told (but you don’t want to write it) or you have a sales or business process that would benefit from a wider reach, getting a book out there is important on a variety of levels.

Most readers couldn’t care less where your book was published or if you have the author credentials to publish. What matters is having a story or idea, and then creating and distributing the best possible version for people to read.

 

Should I write a book?

The short answer is: yes. The longer answer is: yes, but only if you plan on following through. The bitter truth is publishing has changed so dramatically that anyone can write and publish a book; the only barrier to entry is the follow-through to actually do it.

Whether you want to publish a fiction or a nonfiction book, the idea behind having a book is the same: you have a message you want to share. Anyone can blog; putting out a book creates social proof, a means to leverage everything else you do after you publish.

For instance, let’s say that you are a brilliant personal trainer and nutritionist who blogs and is social-media savvy. Your personal education and expertise are unquestioned, but in the vast abyss of the internet, your social proof is limited to people who see your posts.

Having a book allows you to separate from other folks trying to do the same thing, and it allows you to reach a new potential customer base.

How about some examples of folks who might want to write a book?

  • Consultants who want to generate more leads.
  • Though-leaders who want to show how and what we lead.
  • Someone who wants to leave something behind.
  • Entrepreneurs who want to spread their brand.
  • Job seekers and freelancers who want to demonstrate their expertise.
  • Someone looking for a stepping stone.
  • Business owners who want another stream of income.
  • Anyone looking for a purpose.
  • Anyone who wants to become an authority/expert (or feels like they know nothing).

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What now?

Write. If you can’t (or won’t), then get a ghostwriter. There is no shame in contracting out the writing of your product. Often, you won’t have the time or inclination to put the words to the page. Unsolicited advice: choose a ghostwriter who fits well with what you are trying to write. Just because someone has a background in a particular area does not necessarily make them the best fit. This is your baby, so choose wisely. 

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Edit. Do yourself a favor and hire out for editing and proofreading. True, you could get out your red pen and mark it up yourself, but feedback is incredibly important in terms of providing the product consumers want. Speaking of feedback, cultivating a group of beta readers can be a real game-changer. Unsolicited advice: most editors worth their salt will charge anywhere from $3 a page up to $10 a page, depending on what they provide. Most editors calculate a page as 250-400 words a page. 

Format. Sometimes, it is the simple things that make or break a book. People like to imagine they don’t judge a book by its cover, but they most certainly do. You can learn how to format a book for print or as an eBook with a simple Google search, but it doesn’t mean you’ll be able to do it. Contracting out the formatting guarantees the book looks how you intended. Unsolicited advice: know what you want the interior of your book to look like. Otherwise, you’ll be trading emails with a designer until the end of time. Also, realize that formatters can charge anywhere from $1 a page up through $12 a page. 

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Publish. In many ways, this is the part of the process that has changeed the most. Writers have always had to write; that writing then needs to be edited. However, anyone can publish now. With Kindle and print platforms like CreateSpace, you can have a print copy to pass out at seminars and an eBook version for people to read on their smartphones or tablets. Unsolicited advice: set your release date in the future at least three months in order to maximize the next item, marketing. 

Market. This is what everything comes down to. Whether you are traditionally published or self-published, 90% of your efforts should be focused here, as this is what sells books. Marketing is everything from interviews to advertising to content marketing and beyond. Unsolicited advice: learn to market and build a long-term plan punctuated by smaller, measurable goals. Doing this allows you to better track your progress and make changes where you need to. 

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You knew it was coming. All this talk about publishing and contracting out tasks to help you get there meant a referral to someone who provides said services was coming. So, without further ado, here is the promotional plug for Amalgam Consulting.

 

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