The Marketing Blues

The Marketing Blues

Writing a book is difficult; revising and editing is an odyssey.

However, marketing looms large, hanging around your neck like an anchor. Indie authors face an uphill battle. There are hundreds of thousands of new books created each year across a myriad of genres. Depending on the pool you dive into, you may (or may not) have a bastion of potential supportive fans.

Unfortunately, the grind is indeed a millstone.

You must learn to embrace the suck.

I love a rousing speech, but marketing is about discipline and a real desire to share what you have made with the world. Often, in the throes of sending out review emails or contacting media outlets, you are struck by a desperation to simply give up. You might consider just being content with having completed a book.

And truthfully, finishing a book is a real accomplishment. Very real.

Some things that help me get through the grind (and also result in some progress):

  1. Advertising.  Not everyone has the budget to run a full-page ad in The New York Times (I certainly don’t). However, you can chip away with a smaller budget using Facebook, Twitter, and Amazon. If you ran an ad 2-3 times a week, you might be able to run an ad that reaches 10,000 new potential readers for as little as $50.
  2. Starting a conversation. You’re probably on social media; you probably even retweet some truly interesting people. But you likely aren’t having a conversation. The importance of this is in building relationships, showing potential readers that you don’t just want to sell them something: you want to make them a lifelong reader.
  3. Talking to someone new. Every so often I like to shoot for the stars and reach out to someone on social media who’ll probably never respond. You don’t need to tweet Chris Pratt in order to talk to someone new. You could reach out to a columnist you admire (Lauren Duca) or just someone who covers your genre to say you enjoyed what they wrote. Writers are always excited to hear from people who enjoyed their work.
  4. Making a plan. Wondering what to do next? Decide what you want to do. Sell 10 books today? Sell 10,000 books by the end of the year? Get a thousand new followers on Twitter by the end of the year? Figure out what you are aiming for and then build a step-by-step plan to reach it. That’s what I do anyways.
  5. Throwing out the plan. Then sometimes plans change…goals change. You need to adapt with them. Throw out what wasn’t working and plan for something new. The world is constantly changing; you need to be changing with it.

All I know is that if you are unwilling to share your book, then potential readers will likely not be interested in reading it.

 

Purchase Sixth Prime before Fifth Prime arrives!

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On Strong Female Characters, Face-less Heroes, and Myriad Personalities

Sixth Prime

When I started writing Sixth Prime, I decided early on to do something very deliberate: I would make half the main characters women; I would make sure the personalities better reflected the myriad of the human experience; and I would describe characters without using skin color or any physical identifiers.

You might be wondering: what exactly is the point of that?

Women represent half the population

I would be remiss if I ignored the statistics right in front of me. More than half of the world’s population is female, so why wouldn’t I include a representative number of female characters? I’m talking about adventurers and villains, scientists and soldiers, and everything in between. The goal should be to tell the best possible story. I waited until I had outlined everything, and then randomly assigned characters as men and women (this includes romantic relationships as well, so buckle your seatbelts).

Personality guides behavior and decision-making.

I went to graduate school for psychology, and as such I’ve always had a fascination with why people do what they do. This, naturally, translated into thinking about how I could smuggle personality psychology into a narrative. The Prime saga, beginning with Sixth Prime, is an attempt to do just that. I wanted readers to feel like they were represented by one of the characters in such a way that the decisions and consequences felt more real to them.

The reader should decide how the characters look.  

I know it’s a long shot, but maybe (just maybe) the Prime Saga becomes a movie or limited series. I bring this up because nothing is worse than people arguing how characters should look or the kinds of actors or actresses who should play them. Really, even if an adaptation is not in order, I love the idea of people coming to their own conclusions about how a character should look based on their choices, personality, and behavior. I want the characters to be defined by how they make readers feel; I want a reader to be able to see themselves in the character and as the character.

 

Here is the working teaser:

2.3.5.7.11.13.

A war brews as a galaxy struggles to maintain a peace treaty signed in haste. The Commonwealth boasts sprawling cities built upon slums. The Sovereignty has placed the yoke of industry upon its citizens. Sixteen men and women are connected in a way they cannot yet understand. A murder of a prominent artist begins a chain of events that will ultimately determine the fate of the universe.

Only thirteen will remain.

In the end, there can be only one Prime.

Are you a Prime?

 

Interested yet? I sure hope so. If you are, then how about a brief excerpt? Check it out at: https://authordanobrien.com/2016/07/28/preview-of-sixth-prime/

Perhaps you want to grab the Kindle version for only $2.99? http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01ENLPOVG

 

 

Should You Publish a Book? (Or Why Writing A Book Builds Your Brand)

CTA_writer's deskI know it might sound a bit silly for someone who is both a ghostwriter and a multi-published author to say that you should publish a book to expand you brand, but I guarantee I am not the only one saying it. Writing a book is a wonderful experience, if you approach it in the right way and with the right goals in mind.

Self-publishing has made getting a book out there easier than ever; in many ways having a book is the new en vogue marketing piece for businesses and independent authors alike. Whether you have a story that you really want told (but you don’t want to write it) or you have a sales or business process that would benefit from a wider reach, getting a book out there is important on a variety of levels.

Most readers couldn’t care less where your book was published or if you have the author credentials to publish. What matters is having a story or idea, and then creating and distributing the best possible version for people to read.

 

Should I write a book?

The short answer is: yes. The longer answer is: yes, but only if you plan on following through. The bitter truth is publishing has changed so dramatically that anyone can write and publish a book; the only barrier to entry is the follow-through to actually do it.

Whether you want to publish a fiction or a nonfiction book, the idea behind having a book is the same: you have a message you want to share. Anyone can blog; putting out a book creates social proof, a means to leverage everything else you do after you publish.

For instance, let’s say that you are a brilliant personal trainer and nutritionist who blogs and is social-media savvy. Your personal education and expertise are unquestioned, but in the vast abyss of the internet, your social proof is limited to people who see your posts.

Having a book allows you to separate from other folks trying to do the same thing, and it allows you to reach a new potential customer base.

How about some examples of folks who might want to write a book?

  • Consultants who want to generate more leads.
  • Though-leaders who want to show how and what we lead.
  • Someone who wants to leave something behind.
  • Entrepreneurs who want to spread their brand.
  • Job seekers and freelancers who want to demonstrate their expertise.
  • Someone looking for a stepping stone.
  • Business owners who want another stream of income.
  • Anyone looking for a purpose.
  • Anyone who wants to become an authority/expert (or feels like they know nothing).

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What now?

Write. If you can’t (or won’t), then get a ghostwriter. There is no shame in contracting out the writing of your product. Often, you won’t have the time or inclination to put the words to the page. Unsolicited advice: choose a ghostwriter who fits well with what you are trying to write. Just because someone has a background in a particular area does not necessarily make them the best fit. This is your baby, so choose wisely. 

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Edit. Do yourself a favor and hire out for editing and proofreading. True, you could get out your red pen and mark it up yourself, but feedback is incredibly important in terms of providing the product consumers want. Speaking of feedback, cultivating a group of beta readers can be a real game-changer. Unsolicited advice: most editors worth their salt will charge anywhere from $3 a page up to $10 a page, depending on what they provide. Most editors calculate a page as 250-400 words a page. 

Format. Sometimes, it is the simple things that make or break a book. People like to imagine they don’t judge a book by its cover, but they most certainly do. You can learn how to format a book for print or as an eBook with a simple Google search, but it doesn’t mean you’ll be able to do it. Contracting out the formatting guarantees the book looks how you intended. Unsolicited advice: know what you want the interior of your book to look like. Otherwise, you’ll be trading emails with a designer until the end of time. Also, realize that formatters can charge anywhere from $1 a page up through $12 a page. 

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Publish. In many ways, this is the part of the process that has changeed the most. Writers have always had to write; that writing then needs to be edited. However, anyone can publish now. With Kindle and print platforms like CreateSpace, you can have a print copy to pass out at seminars and an eBook version for people to read on their smartphones or tablets. Unsolicited advice: set your release date in the future at least three months in order to maximize the next item, marketing. 

Market. This is what everything comes down to. Whether you are traditionally published or self-published, 90% of your efforts should be focused here, as this is what sells books. Marketing is everything from interviews to advertising to content marketing and beyond. Unsolicited advice: learn to market and build a long-term plan punctuated by smaller, measurable goals. Doing this allows you to better track your progress and make changes where you need to. 

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You knew it was coming. All this talk about publishing and contracting out tasks to help you get there meant a referral to someone who provides said services was coming. So, without further ado, here is the promotional plug for Amalgam Consulting.

 

Is impatience the real enemy of reaching your goals?

If you are like most writers, the excitement of writing a book can very nearly be everything you need to finish and publish, to reach your goal. In many ways, this is true of all goal-setting behavior. I was lamenting the other day that I really wanted to be done with Sixth Prime (seriously, click and give it a read) because I think it will resonate with readers. Even though there is still another draft to go before several rounds of edits, and then design, I wanted it now.

Why is that I wonder?

The impatience paradox. I talk a lot about starting goals and setting goals, but very little about completing a goal when you have stalled in the middle. I like to call this the impatience paradox. This is the overwhelming feeling that creeps in mid-goal, which is usually accompanied by fatigue with the process and a burning, irrational desire that people should already be supportive of the finished product (or goal). For writers, this is often the moment when you think this book could be “the one,” and you really just want everyone to be sharing and reading and writing and freaking out over it. As normal as that sounds (impatience happens to everyone in pursuit of a goal, especially if that goal is within reach), it can be a productivity and discipline killer. It can make you switch your focus or collapse beneath the weight of wanting it to be done. So what can you do?

Overcoming impatience. Don’t let impatience keep you from reaching your goals. In order to get past impatience, you need to recognize it for what it is: fear. More than likely, you are having anxiety about the outcome of your goal, or how achieving your goal will affect you. Once you publish that book, people will react to it. What if they hate it? What if they love it? What if it doesn’t sell? What if people want more? Regardless of how it makes you feel, you need to remember that you started down this path for a very good reason. You had a goal; don’t give up now.

Reaching your goals. So, how do you get back on track? Simple: remember why you started down this path in the first place. Return to both the long-term goal you set in the beginning and the smaller goals in support of it. Rebuild those behavior-reward dyads once more and trend toward discipline; make the goal more important than the smaller roadblocks you put in your way. Use the simple formula of pairing the behavior that needs to be completed (writing every day) in order to reach your goal (finishing your novel) with a reward you only get when you perform that behavior (writing every day, just in case you forgot).

Being able to embrace that you are impatient, and can still reach your goals, sets you up for success in the future. The real enemy is giving up.

CTA_writer's desk